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SARAH: CONNECT WITH ISRAEL

Sarah Kleymeyer found her trip to Israel is helping her to create an active Jewish life right here in Cincinnati. Organized by the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, this trip brought 25 Cincinnatians and 10 Israelis—seven students and three soldiers—together for ten days.

READ SARAH'S STORY

“I don’t want to have just a passive Jewish life, I want to have an active Jewish life. So getting to explore Israel was a very important thing,” said Sarah Kleymeyer after her return last summer to Cincinnati.

LAUREN: LEAVE NO ONE BEHIND

Independent and outgoing, Lauren enjoys cooking, crafts, exercise, friends, and a hug from from caretaker Mattie DeLoach. She says, “We’re one big happy family, grown together.”

Read Lauren's Story

Lauren had a tumor when she was five years old that resulted in mental impairment,” says her mother, Inez Allen...

THE WOLKOFFS: CATAPULT CAREERS

When long-time Montgomery resident Carol Wolkoff sent her 24-year-old daughter Rachel to talk with Dedra Perlmutter, a career consultant at JVS Career Services, she had no idea the visit would result in new career opportunities for her entire family.

READ THE WOLKOFFS' STORY

Six months later, Rachel is happily settled in a new career. Carol’s son, Jeffrey, is excelling in his first job out of college. Her college-aged daughter, Samantha, is ready for the right internship. What’s more, Carol and her husband, David, have discovered that work can be fun again. Both have started new careers utilizing their existing skills in more satisfying and challenging ways.

JEWISH CINCINNATI CARES FOR SPECIAL NEEDS

“Maddy has a lot of cognitive delays,” Ms. Scott said, “but because she looks so normal, they thought she had bad behavior.” She wanted Maddy to be active. They tried soccer—“total flop”—they tried swimming at three different places. “They always had to stop and take care of Maddy, and I overheard the parents saying ‘Oh my God, I’m paying all this money for this?!’ So after a year of that I really didn’t involve her in anything—she had no friends.”

READ MADDY'S STORY

“I may cry,” is the first thing Laureen Scott said, sitting on a bench under bright blue sky, when asked how her daughter Maddy went to camp this past summer. In bright blue t-shirt and shorts, Maddy Scott circled her mom, then ran off to chase friends, and be part of the day’s activities at the Mayerson JCC’s Camp at the J. Soon though she veered back for another hug, mumbling, “I love you,” in her mom’s ear.

Daniel: Bridge Cultural Divides

The son of Russian immigrants who made their first American home in Cincinnati’s Roselawn community, Daniel grew that interest into a passionate sense of Jewish identity by taking part in nearly a dozen programs offered by Cincinnati’s Jewish agencies.

READ DANIEL'S STORY

“I didn’t know much about Israel and Judaism. I didn’t have the passion, but I knew that I had an interest,” says 21-year-old Daniel Dolzhansky.

BOB: DEVELOP TOMORROW'S LEADERS

A Cincinnati native, Bob went through the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati’s leadership development program for young professionals, called LEAD, with that desire to help in mind. Today he serves on numerous Jewish nonprofit boards, including the Jewish Federation’s board, and knows a significant amount about how Jewish and non-Jewish agencies help people with disabilities.

READ BOB'S STORY

“During college, I had a job in a workshop helping folks with developmental disabilities. That’s when I had my moment: this cause doesn’t get enough attention—what can I do to help?” said Bob Oestreicher.

Olga: Restore Hope

Olga and her family receive help in the form of a food card, a medical equipment loan, winter relief, and financial assistance.

READ OLGA'S STORY

“We just stood in the doorway, we lowered our heads and waited for the explosion. We felt the building around us falling apart,” said Olga Tulchinsky, her voice rising as she recounted her last days in Lugansk, Ukraine.

JEWISH CINCINNATI CARES FOR SENIORS

A Holocaust survivor and a gifted storyteller, Stephanie Marks has educated over 11,000 students about the Holocaust. At age 89, living alone, she was told she would never walk unassisted again. She needed help. Today, she has the support she needs. Stephanie is one of thousands of people who rely on programs funded in part by donations through the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati.

Read Stephanie's Story

A handmade photo-collage propped on the couch, made by her granddaughter, announces that Stephanie Marks has just turned 90....

JEWISH CINCINNATI CONNECTS

LeeAnne is one of thousands of people who rely on programs that help us discover personally meaningful ways to understand Jewish life. Thanks to programs funded in part by donations through the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, LeeAnne and her family are enriched by Jewish culture and community every day.

READ LEEANNE'S STORY

Since she was not raised Jewish, LeeAnne struggled to teach Jewish values and tradition in a kid-friendly way. Thanks to free, monthly stories in the mail from PJ Library, and PJ Library activities, her family is enriched by Jewish culture and community every day.

JEWISH CINCINNATI DISCOVERS

Rosie is one of thousands of people who rely on programs that help us discover personally meaningful ways to understand Jewish life. Thanks to programs funded in part by donations through the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, Rosie and her students have a deeper understanding of the Holocaust and its meanings.

READ ROSIE'S STORY

Despite being an award-winning English teacher, Rosie Sansalone found herself struggling when she first encountered Elie Wiesel’s Holocaust memoir....

JEWISH CINCINNATI CARES

Alba is one of thousands of people who rely on programs that care for people in need. Thanks to these programs—funded in part by donations through the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati —Alba's life is vibrant and healthy.

READ ALBA'S STORY

At an age when many seniors are reliant on others to care for their day-to-day needs, Alba started a new life. Twelve years later, thanks to nine programs funded in part through the Jewish Federation, this 92-year-old has a full and independent life. Alba is one of Jewish Cincinnati's everyday heroes.

JEWISH CINCINNATI DISCOVERS

Harley is one of thousands of people who rely on programs that help us discover personally meaningful ways to be Jewish. Thanks to 10 programs funded in part by donations through the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, Harley has a strong Jewish identity and an unbreakable bond with Israel.

READ HARLEY'S STORY

Despite her father's concern, UC sophomore Harley wasn't going to college to "look for more ways to be more Jewish." But a party at Hillel on her first day led to her joining the student board and traveling to Israel twice in six months. It turns out Dad was right!

JEWISH CINCINNATI CARES

Leslye is one of thousands of people who rely on programs that ensure quality of life and aid financial stability. Thanks to four programs funded in part by donations through the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, Leslye's physical and emotional needs are supported.

READ LESLYE'S STORY

A successful professional and regular volunteer, Leslye's life fell apart after her family moved to Cincinnati for her husband’s job. Divorce, poverty, and a diagnosis of MS led to "chaos," as she puts it. Jewish Family Service provided the help she needed, even a sense of purpose...

JEWISH CINCINNATI CARES GLOBALLY

Lisa is one of hundreds of thousands of people who rely on programs that help support Jewish life in Israel and globally. Thanks to 4 programs funded in part by donations through the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, Lisa and her neighbors have emergency food and shelter.

READ LISA'S STORY

Due to the heavy fighting in Ukraine, Lisa's basement became a bomb shelter, her neighborhood a war zone. She and her neighbors were left without food, sometimes without shelter. JDC, funded in part by the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, was there to help.

JEWISH CINCINNATI CONNECTS

Mark is one of thousands of people who rely on programs that connect individuals and families to a Jewish way of life. Thanks to these programs—funded in part by donations through the Jewish Federation of Cincinnati—we are creating an engaged and empowered community. JVS Career Services has been instrumental in helping Mark find employment.

Read Mark's Story

In his mid-50s, a seasoned sales professional, Mark was suddenly out of work after his company downsized. He was in shock—he had two kids in college and retirement looming. After three months of looking, he still had found nothing.